April 7-13 is Dog Bite Prevention Week 2019, and Animal Protective Services would like to take this opportunity to share a few ways that you can prevent dog bites from happening in our community.

Although dogs are our best friends, more than 4.5 million people are bitten by canines in the United States every year. Children are the most common victims of dog bites, and at least half of the 800,000 people who receive medical care for dog bites each year are children. To reduce the number of these injuries, adults and children should be educated about bite prevention, and dog owners should practice responsible dog ownership.

  • Ask first before petting a dog. When meeting an unfamiliar dog, don’t reach out to pet her. First, ask her pet parent, “May I pet your dog?” A strange hand in a dog’s face may scare her, leading to a bite.
  • After you receive permission to pet a dog, let her sniff your closed hand. Then, you may proceed to pet her shoulders or chest. Avoid petting the top of the dog’s head.
  • Don’t touch a dog who is sleeping, eating or chewing a toy. Respect her space, as startled dogs are more likely to bite.
  • Avoid dogs who are barking or growling. It is also best to steer clear of dogs who are loose, behind a fence or tied up.
  • If an unknown dog approaches you, stay quiet and still. Do not run or scream.

ANY DOG CAN BITE!    Good dog…Bad situation.

Recognize when your dog is stressed, uncomfortable, or showing signs of aggression. Situations can escalate quickly, and you may not have time to react.

Working together we can help to prevent dog bites.

Contact Kate Marshall (910) 477-1486 for more information or with any questions.

Animal Protective Services also offers Dog Bite Prevention Programs and Animal Safety Classes for all ages. Call to schedule your class today.